Posts by Christine Welborn

Dallas County Encourages Citizens to Commit Fraud

Posted by |

In a vote of 4-1 the Dallas County Commissioners Court voted to encourage voters to commit fraud by marking themselves as disabled on applications for ballot by mail when they are in fact healthy. The resolution contradicts Texas law and a recent advisory letter from Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton.

As outlined in a previous DAT article, this action isn’t truly about protecting the health and safety of citizens, but about increasing voting by mail.

DAT’s own work, as well as the efforts of Starr County District Attorney Omar Escobar, and others, have shown mail-in voting to be extremely vulnerable to vote harvesting, theft of ballots, forgery, and other forms of fraud. This Dallas County decision endorses one of those fraudulent activities, falsely claiming disability.

The resolution was put forward by Commissioner John Wiley Price and seconded by Commissioner Theresa Daniel. Price defended his resolution by speaking about the practices of ballot by mail in other states such as Oregon and Washington. He fails to recognize that those states adopted ballot by mail through their legislatures and Governors, not County officials thwarting the established law. 

Read More

Constitutional Victory

Posted by |

Justice Larry Doss was victorious in his election contest and will have a new election against his challenger Steven Denny. Denny won the race for the 7th Court of Appeals by 319 votes, however, it was later discovered that Cochran and Collingsworth Counties omitted this race from their ballots. The citizens of those counties were disenfranchised, and their votes and voices were taken from them.

That was the general ruling of Judge Stacy Trotter of the 358th District Court. He stated that the omissions kept “1,214 eligible voters from Cochran and Collingsworth counties from participating in this election and voting for and selecting the candidate of their choice.”

It is comforting to know that there are courts in Texas that still protect the constitutional rights of citizens. The citizens of all 46 counties in the 7th Court of Appeals District should see this race on their Republican Primary Runoff ballot in July.

The ruling now begs the question, why did Doss have to pay for a contest when this race so clearly should have been voided? Direct Action Texas has reached out to the Republican Party of Texas and the Republican Party County Chairmen of both Cochran and Collingsworth for comment on why these races were certified, but we have received no responses. 

Read More

Two Counties Disenfranchised in GOP Judicial Race

Posted by |

The 7th Court of Appeals serves 46 counties and this year Chief Justice and Place 4 were on the GOP Primary ballot for all but two of them. Voters in Cochran County and Collingsworth County were denied the right to vote in these races because they were left off the ballot

Civil Rights Violated

The Chief Justice race was uncontested, but the race for Place 4 was decided by only 319 votes. Challenger Steven Denny received 46,002 votes to the incumbent Larry Doss’s 45,683 votes. Cochran County had a 26% turnout with 458 casting a ballot. Collingsworth County had a turnout of 38% with 723 voters. These are small counties, but either could have flipped the election. However, these voters were not given the opportunity to vote. The voices of 1181 citizens were silenced, and their civil rights were violated.

How Did This Happen?

Read More

Midland’s Unconstitutional Recall Restrictions

Posted by |

The bar for a recall election should be reasonably high, but the Midland City Charter requires the violation of constitutional rights. It violates the secret ballot by requiring petition signers to reveal their choice at the ballot box.

Article VI of the Midland City Charter states:

This means that the recall petition must have been signed by 20% of qualified voters in the City of Midland and half of those signatures must belong to people who signed an affidavit stating they voted for the person who is being recalled. There are several problems with these requirements, the most egregious being the violation of civil rights.

First of all, American citizens have the right to a secret ballot. These voters should not have to reveal their choice at the ballot box. If a mayor or city council member’s offenses have risen to the level of recall in the eyes of the citizens, why do the signatures, and therefore voices, of the people who voted for the offending individual get to carry more weight? 

For example, in November of 2019 Midland elected two city council members, one of which was in District 4. At the time there were 18,417 eligible voters in the district. Therefore, a recall petition would require 3,683 signatures and 1,842 of those voters must have signed affidavits that they voted for the victor. That candidate may have won 56% of the vote, but only 15% of the electorate cast a vote for her. That leaves 85% of Midland with only half a voice because the 15% have the other half by statute.

Second, this statue results in one individual’s vote carrying more weight and necessarily power. This is true of ballots cast by citizens for the target of a recall effort compared to citizen’s cast ballots and Midlanders who may not have voted but are negatively impacted to the degree that they would sign a recall petition.

The Midland recall process is not only unconstitutional, but it is virtually insurmountable. It is merely an illusion of safeguarding the public trust. It may as well not be there at all. That would at least be a more honest and transparent approach. Citizens of Midland should demand more from their representatives.

Interim Hearing

Posted by |

Today, the Texas House Elections Committee held a hearing in Austin to discuss interim charges.

Issued by lame-duck Speaker of the House, Dennis Bonnen, to his similarly situated committee chairs, this hearing and subsequent hearings are likely to be little more than going through the motions.

Interim charges issued by Bonnen followed his announcement that he would not seek reelection, following him and his consultants butt fumbling of public relations after the release of a recording of the Speaker making derogatory comments about fellow members and offering a quid pro quo to conservative leader Michael Quinn Sullivan.

The committee took invited testimony from Keith Ingram, Secretary of State Director of Elections, and Chris Davis, representing the Texas Association of Elections Administrators. The hearing, when boiled down, amounted to oversight of legislation passed during the 2019 legislative session.

Read More

Pin It on Pinterest