Posts by Christine Welborn

DAT Files New Complaints: Kaufman County

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Direct Action Texas has just filed new complaints with the Secretary of State detailing 47 counts of election fraud in Kaufman County. Our filing comes shortly after a District Judge called for a new election for the Republican nomination for County Court at Law 1. Judge Marty Lowy nullified the original results where Judge Jones had won his race by only one vote, citing voter fraud as well as violations of Federal Law, according to a recent Federal Court ruling.

Several voters took the stand in the Election Contest. One elderly couple, who could not read nor write, said that they don’t recall ever filling out or signing an application for a ballot by mail. They believe that their “voting papers” just arrive in their mailbox. A woman took the stand and said she doesn’t remember voting since JFK, and if she had voted it would have been in the Democrat Primary. Her vote was actually cast in the Republican Primary. Some recognized their signatures, some did not. In one case a voter said, “it looks like someone tried to write like me.” The details of their testimony varied, but all of them had one thing in common. None of them knew for whom they voted. None of them could name a single person on their ballot. Someone else had voted in their name.

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New Election Called for Kaufman County Court at Law #1

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Visiting Judge Marty Lowy has called for a new election for the Kaufman County Court at Law #1 Republican nomination. He ruled that 9 provisional ballots should have been counted and that at least 5 mail-in ballots should not have been counted, leading to results that just cannot be determined for one side or the other. The margin was just one vote to begin with, in favor of incumbent Judge Dennis Jones. His challenger, Tracy Gray, had won the in-person vote for Early Voting and on Election Day and yet lost the mail-in vote by a wide margin.

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TEC Rules In Favor of DAT’s Complaint Against Catherine Goodman

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The Texas Ethics Commission (TEC) has affirmed Direct Action Texas’ complaint against Catherine Goodman, former candidate for Tarrant County Probate Court 1.  DAT filed the complaint when we noticed that Goodman had accepted $5,000 over the limit set by the Judicial Fairness Act from a married couple. (For the original article on the complaint click HERE.)

The married couple in question are Dyann and Jere McCully. Dyann McCully is an attorney and a partner at the Blum Firm.  According to their website, they are “the largest estate planning firm in Texas and the largest boutique firm in the United States solely dedicated to estate planning.” McCully and her firm would certainly benefit from a friendly Probate Court Judge.

In her Assurance of Voluntary Compliance, Goodman admits to accepting the contributions, but “swore that she did not accept the contributions knowing they were in excess of the limits.” Goodman also claims that her first knowledge of the violation was DAT’s article. This may be true, but ignorance of the law is not a good habit for a lawyer, and especially not someone seeking to become a judge.

Goodman has allegedly returned the $5,000 contribution and the TEC will not assess a civil penalty. Goodman’s former opponents could still pursue civil damages, however.

Once again DAT has illustrated the importance of constant vigilance. The limitations of the Judicial Campaign Fairness Act are well known but the TEC will not act unless someone files a complaint. Candidates as well as elected officials must be held accountable.

Indictments for Voter Fraud in Nueces County

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In a press release, Attorney General Ken Paxton announced his office’s participation in the prosecution of three Robstown residents indicted for voter fraud committed in the 2016 election cycle. Direct Action Texas (DAT) first reported on the Office of the Attorney General’s (OAG) active investigations into voter fraud in Robstown last August.  A few months later, after the November election, DAT began to research voter fraud in Robstown that took place in the 2017 municipal election. That research resulting in DAT filing 30 Election Fraud complaints. It was clear that Election Fraud was alive and well in Robstown, Texas and it continued through the Runoff Election in December of 2017. Now the harvesters may finally be brought to justice. Cynthia Kay Gonzalez, Rosita Torres Flores, and Robert Gonzalez have been indicted for nine counts of voter fraud, collectively.

View the indictment against Cynthia Kay Gonzalez here: http://bit.ly/2FizZtg

View the indictment against Rosita Torres Flores here: http://bit.ly/2FiE40r

View the indictment against Robert Gonzales here: http://bit.ly/2Fk3tTt

Probate Court Candidate Goodman’s Fuzzy Math

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Catherine Goodman is using some fuzzy math to manipulate the results of the Tarrant County Bar Association (TCBA) Survey to declare herself the highest rated candidate. Goodman is the candidate for Judge, Probate Court 1 that almost didn’t make it on the ballot. She had to withdraw her application for a place on the ballot and reapply. Inside sources say this was due to problems with her petition signatures. Goodman has also struggled with her campaign finance compliance, as reported by Direct Action Texas. Now it looks like Goodman has chosen to manipulate the results of the TCBA Survey to boost her chances.

The Tarrant County Bar Association asked its members to rate each candidate as well qualified, qualified, or not qualified. If they didn’t know the candidate, they were instructed to answer, “No Opinion.” At first glance, Mark Sullivan has the highest rating with 25% well qualified versus Goodman’s 23.1% well qualified. If you look at the raw number of votes, Sullivan is still ahead with 151 well qualified to Goodman’s 139.

Goodman would like you to throw out the “No Opinion” votes and recalculate the percentages. That would skew the numbers in her favor, giving her 54% for well qualified to Sullivan’s 51%. However, that method is statistically insignificant. Remove the “No Opinion” vote and you are suddenly comparing apples to oranges. The results cannot be compared when there is now a different number of people voting in each candidate’s survey. If you wanted to properly discount the “No Opinion” voters you would have to compare the categories individually, as shown here. Those numbers still put Mark Sullivan on top.

Perhaps the more interesting numbers are not those of Goodman and Sullivan, but those of Patricia Cole. With 117 votes for “Not Qualified,” no matter which way you calculate it, she has the highest number in that category.

Catherine Goodman had difficulties following the law when applying for a position on the ballot, disregarded campaign finance laws, and is now manipulating results to show them in her favor. On the campaign trail she says she writes the law and that she knows the law, but can she follow the law?

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