Ethics

A Costly Contribution

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Probate Court 1 candidate Catherine Goodman exceeded the amount for a contribution by twice the legal limit. Now that contribution may cost her up to $55,000 plus legal fees, should her opponents decide to pursue the violation.

Judicial candidates have to follow stricter guidelines than other candidates for office. For instance, they have limits on how much money they may accept from an individual. This fact is well known among judicial candidates. According to Election Code 253.155, in a county-wide judicial race in Tarrant County, the contribution limit is $5,000 per individual. A recent Campaign Finance Report (CFR) shows that one candidate exceeded that limit. Catherine Goodman, candidate for Judge in Tarrant County’s Probate Court 1, accepted a contribution twice that of the legal limit!

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Update: The Residency Game

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Direct Action Texas (DAT) has now filed an official election complaint with the Texas Secretary of State (SoS) concerning Jay Harris of Denton County. DAT recently reported on his problematic application for Precinct Chair of precinct 4006. On his application Harris lists his address as 900 Bluebonnet, but Harris actually lives in precinct 1015, at 2221 Hollyhill.

Not only are the two precincts on opposites sides of the city, they also have different representation. For instance, while Harris should be voting in Senate District 12, he will be voting in Senate District 30, potentially illegally. The people he currently represents are not his neighbors. He doesn’t live in their community. He has to drive almost 20 minutes to get there from his actual residence. Read More

You Had One Job Tarrant County GOP

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The results of the race for Justice of the Peace Precinct 3 could be determined by the failures of a County Chair and his staff. A judge will now decide which of the candidates in this race will remain on the ballot.

Precinct 3 incumbent, Justice of the Peace Russell Casey, filed suit against Tarrant County Republican Chairman Tim O’Hare, claiming O’Hare violated Election Law when he denied Casey’s petition to have his challengers removed from the ballot. According to Casey, the Tarrant County GOP (TCGOP) did not properly complete William “Bill” Brandt’s and Leonard “Lenny” Lopez’s petition signature paperwork for ballot access.

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What is the Fort Worth ISD School Board Hiding?

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Direct Action Texas (DAT) called out the Fort Worth ISD School Board for ditching their ethics policy just before voting on a $750 million bond package. We opined that certain Board Trustees made the decision because they may be unable to adhere to the new policy and cash in on the massive bond. So, they buried its repeal in a long, vaguely worded consent agenda.

Other Trustees were outraged when they discovered the subterfuge, feeling tricked into voting out the merely three-month-old policy. Even the liberal Fort Worth Star Telegram weighed in against the removal of the policy with a serious of articles including this scathing rebuke from the Editorial Board. As outlined in another FWST piece, the Board is still in turmoil over what “ethics” means in Fort Worth. Read More

False CPS Reports Against Bo French – Part 2

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A couple weeks ago DAT broke the story on the false CPS report filed against Bo French and his wife. It has been described as the dirtiest political move in recent Texas politics.

The suit describes a series of events which lead to the complaint, but one event in particular triggered the story – messages sent out by Constable Clint Burgess. During early voting Constable Burgess sent these messages, and others, out to dozens of people. Direct Action Texas has obtained copies of the messages from several sources. They are lengthy and available HERE.

While there are several demonstrably false statements in Constable Burgess’s messages, the French’s suit specifically mentions Constable Burgess’s claim that law enforcement had been sent to the French residence on numerous occasions for “domestic situations”.

When a member of law enforcement makes a claim like this, reasonable people believe him. As a law enforcement officer, Clint has knowledge as to whether or not the allegation is true. Surely a constable wouldn’t be spreading a demonstrable lie around, in writing none the less, right? Read More

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