Real Stories of Real Fraud

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Despite the constant claims by the mainstream media, mail-in ballot fraud does exist and becomes more and more prevalent with each election cycle.

The following are real stories told by real voters during interviews with Direct Action Texas in 2015. We have been told countless versions of these same stories in the years since.

The names of the voters have been changed for their protection.

My ballot just arrives.

David was questioned about his experience voting by mail. When asked about filling out his application he seemed puzzled. David said that he never filled out an application. His ballot simply arrived in the mail for each election. (Texas Election Code requires that a new application must be sent by the voter at least once a year.)

He went on to say that each election he receives his ballot and waits for the nice young lady to come by and help him fill it out. He tells her his candidate choices and she bubbles it all in for him. He does not check her work to make sure she did as he instructed and many of his choices are actually her suggestions.

Someone has clearly been sending in an application in his name each year for years and then sending a friendly harvester to assist. This is an illegal form of assistance because she did not provide her name and information, originally arrived unsolicited, and promoted one candidate over another.

I want to vote for the Democrats.

Julia was asked about her experience with the young woman who comes to help with her ballot. She said that she gets help with her mail-in ballot every election. It isn’t always the same person, but it is typically a young woman who appears sweet, friendly, and trustworthy. 

In the most recent May election, Julia told the young woman she wanted to vote for all the Democrats. The woman nodded her head and filled out the ballot. Julia hadn’t realized it was a local, non-partisan election. The young woman did not alert Julia that the candidates were not Democrats vs. Republicans. 

There’s no telling who Julia actually voted for in that election. Julia certainly doesn’t know. Most likely her ballot was cast for the slate paying the young woman.

We vote in person.

A voter named Rodrigo told us a story about his stolen vote and stolen voice.

One day a young woman came to Rodrigo’s door and asked if he would like to vote by mail. Rodrigo responded that he and his wife always vote in person because the polling place is right across the street. He then pointed to a building a short distance from his door. 

The young woman continued to attempt to convince Rodrigo that he and his wife should vote by mail instead. Rodrigo kept insisting that he would prefer to vote in person. The back and forth went on for several minutes.

Finally, the young woman stopped persisting and asked if Rodrigo and his wife would at least sign her paper to prove to her boss she had been to the door.  She claimed that if they would sign, she would be finished for the day and could go home. She seemed like such a nice person, so Rodrigo and his wife signed her paper. Most of the paper was obscured by other papers and all the couple really saw were two signature blanks on yellow paper. They signed, said goodbye to the young woman and went about their day.

On Election Day Rodrigo and his wife went to vote in person, just as they always had. Only this time they were told they couldn’t vote. They had already voted by mail.

Someone had applied for mail-in ballots in their names, stolen their ballots from their mailbox, and tricked them into signing their own carrier envelopes containing ballots later marked with choices that were not their own.

That’s not how I write my name.

Amelia and Martha are sisters who live together. Both women were asked to look at the signatures on their applications for ballot by mail and the envelopes that carried their voted ballots. Amelia had suffered a stroke and her unsteady hand was evident in her carrier envelope, but not in her application. Martha recognized this fact and verified that the signature on the carrier envelope was most likely that of her sister.

Martha looked at her own carrier envelope and recognized her signature. However, she was shocked by the signature on the application. Her first remark was “that is not how I make my Ms.” The capital “M” of the two signatures were remarkably different. Martha couldn’t imagine why someone would forge her signature. Then again, she doesn’t remember applying for a ballot by mail.

All of these stories represent people whose votes and voices were stolen by mail-in ballot harvesters. These are real stories of voter suppression. Kind, trusting people victimized by people willing to break the law to push their agenda. Voting in person is the safest, most secure way to vote. If you qualify and must vote from home, do so, but be cautious.

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