Collin County

McKinney – The Face of Government Creep

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One of the biggest lies elected officials believe is that their number one job is to represent their constituents, whomever they believe those constituents to be. This is a fallacy. The most overly represented crowd these days are the “easily triggered”. Enter the City of McKinney and it’s city council.

In October of 2017 the city passed an ordinance banning electioneering in the city except in their “Designated Area for Electioneering”. Electioneering is the simple act of talking to someone about the upcoming or current election. The council said they had to pass this ordinance in order to allow people to go vote without having to engage campaigns on their way in. The mayor actually stated he believes people have this right – although he never sourced where that right came from. The right to seek political redress of our government is a fundamentally ‘all American’ value, but McKinney city council members believe it is their job to respond to the easily triggered over protecting the right to engage in political speech.

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De Facto State Property Tax

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In 2016, property values in Collin County increased by an average of 8.9%. No doubt, with the move of ToYoram.Solomonyota and other large companies to the County, it’s a great place to live in, and in great demand, which drives property values up. However, there is a downside to the increase in values: even while keeping similar tax rates, actual property taxes increased by almost 10%.

An increase in property values does not automatically translate into an increase in local expenditures.  Read More

Taxpayer Funded Government Lobbyists: Are You Unknowingly Funding a Lobbyist?

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The 84th Legislative session in Austin was fun to watch. An intriguing debate was had surrounding “Local Control”. This debate will only grow and take higher priority on the floor of the House in upcoming sessions.

The debate about local control stems around what Austin can legislate in regards to local governments–cities, counties and special purpose districts. Often lost in this debate is the fact that those governments are themselves creations of the state; therefore the state has complete oversight.

As with any debate, there are citizens on both sides…but some citizens have more of a voice than others.

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The Texas Borrowing Binge

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Think the federal government is the only one with a debt problem? Think again.

According to the Texas Bond Review Board (BRB), the state agency charged with overseeing debt issuances, Texas’ total local debt (including principal and interest) exceeded $338 billion in 2015. This means that every man, woman and child in the state owes about $12,250 for his or her share of all the debt incurred by city, county, school and special purpose governments. And the tab for Texas taxpayers is growing fast.

Read the full article on the Forbes website.

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