elections

TEC Rules In Favor of DAT’s Complaint Against Catherine Goodman

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The Texas Ethics Commission (TEC) has affirmed Direct Action Texas’ complaint against Catherine Goodman, former candidate for Tarrant County Probate Court 1.  DAT filed the complaint when we noticed that Goodman had accepted $5,000 over the limit set by the Judicial Fairness Act from a married couple. (For the original article on the complaint click HERE.)

The married couple in question are Dyann and Jere McCully. Dyann McCully is an attorney and a partner at the Blum Firm.  According to their website, they are “the largest estate planning firm in Texas and the largest boutique firm in the United States solely dedicated to estate planning.” McCully and her firm would certainly benefit from a friendly Probate Court Judge.

In her Assurance of Voluntary Compliance, Goodman admits to accepting the contributions, but “swore that she did not accept the contributions knowing they were in excess of the limits.” Goodman also claims that her first knowledge of the violation was DAT’s article. This may be true, but ignorance of the law is not a good habit for a lawyer, and especially not someone seeking to become a judge.

Goodman has allegedly returned the $5,000 contribution and the TEC will not assess a civil penalty. Goodman’s former opponents could still pursue civil damages, however.

Once again DAT has illustrated the importance of constant vigilance. The limitations of the Judicial Campaign Fairness Act are well known but the TEC will not act unless someone files a complaint. Candidates as well as elected officials must be held accountable.

Post Primaries…Now What?

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With the Primaries in the rear view mirror, Direct Action Texas’ work has kicked into high gear. As Texas’ only organization with proven results in finding election fraud, our phones and email have been busy with tips and information about election discrepancies and nefarious activity.

It might surprise you to learn a good number of the leads we’ve received have come from two state agencies. These two agencies have gotten information and/or seen evidence they believe points to election fraud. To whom do they turn to handle such serious allegations? Direct Action Texas. We are the only ones these agencies can rely on to actually investigate and file formal complaints. One of the biggest misconceptions the public has regarding elections is believing that there is some government agency which ensures they’re conducted fairly.

There simply is no one with that job. The state has turned to us for help. We’re honored and happy to oblige.

The sheer number of tips we received forces us to work through them quickly and prioritize those where fraud is verifiable and prosecution is possible. Currently we are looking at primaries in just over 30 counties. Here are two examples of types of investigations we’re pursuing:

  • Once again we found ourselves in East Texas, this time in Gregg County, where mail-in ballots appear to have been compromised. We’ve found major red flags in the Commissioner Precinct 4 race, findings law enforcement is going to be extremely interested in learning about. We will be making our criminal complaint public in the coming weeks.
  • Last week we published a video of a harvester working a nursing home in Harris County. If you have not watched that video, you need to see what harvesting in action looks like – SEE IT HERE. State Rep. Harold Dutton is already out denying the video…oddly enough before anyone publicly blamed him.  DAT has more videos and is investigating this case as well, stay tuned for updates soon.

From the Texas Panhandle to the border, we have counties with voting irregularities, each distinct in nature. Digging into these elections is long and tedious as there’s significant delay in simply getting the information from each county. After the election, by statute, it can take up to 30 days for counties to provide certain election information. We can not begin analyzing the results until we have received all the information. With over 30 counties we are tracking, just getting the election data in-house is chore. Then the real work on sifting through the begins.

We expect to have as many as a half a dozen criminal complaints from this primary. It could be more, depending on what we find. Mail-in ballot fraud is a real, as is vote harvesting, both of which are wide-spread problems in Texas. One would think the legislature would allocate the resources necessary to  ensure the integrity of our elections.

Until they do, you’ll find DAT digging through the evidence. Stay tuned for updates.

 

Update: The Residency Game

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Direct Action Texas (DAT) has now filed an official election complaint with the Texas Secretary of State (SoS) concerning Jay Harris of Denton County. DAT recently reported on his problematic application for Precinct Chair of precinct 4006. On his application Harris lists his address as 900 Bluebonnet, but Harris actually lives in precinct 1015, at 2221 Hollyhill.

Not only are the two precincts on opposites sides of the city, they also have different representation. For instance, while Harris should be voting in Senate District 12, he will be voting in Senate District 30, potentially illegally. The people he currently represents are not his neighbors. He doesn’t live in their community. He has to drive almost 20 minutes to get there from his actual residence. Read More

More Smoke and Mirrors – A Look at #TXLege Election Reforms

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They are at it again!

Who is they? Those who provide cover to lazy, squish politicians, such as the RPT’s legal council Eric Opiela.

What are they up to again? Opiela would have you believe state lawmakers accomplished their mission of “meaningful” election reform. Those alleged reforms are the following four bills: SB 1666, HB 1735, HB 2691, Hb 4034.

What are the facts?

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DAT Files Election Complaint on Dallas County – 4th County

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Today Direct Action Texas (DAT) filed its 4th criminal complaint with the Texas Secretary of State’s office regarding election violations in as many counties.

This last Monday Dallas’ ABC affiliate ran a report on voters who have complained about receiving ballots which they did not apply for. When they requested copies of their alleged applications, voters told reports the handwriting is not theirs, nor the signature. (Watch the WFAA story here)

This came as no surprise to Direct Action Texas, we recognized the handwriting on the application shown on the screen as that of Jose Rodriquez. DAT has compiled an extensive amount of evidence on Mr. Rodriguez. Read More

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