Tarrant County

Probate Court Candidate Goodman’s Fuzzy Math

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Catherine Goodman is using some fuzzy math to manipulate the results of the Tarrant County Bar Association (TCBA) Survey to declare herself the highest rated candidate. Goodman is the candidate for Judge, Probate Court 1 that almost didn’t make it on the ballot. She had to withdraw her application for a place on the ballot and reapply. Inside sources say this was due to problems with her petition signatures. Goodman has also struggled with her campaign finance compliance, as reported by Direct Action Texas. Now it looks like Goodman has chosen to manipulate the results of the TCBA Survey to boost her chances.

The Tarrant County Bar Association asked its members to rate each candidate as well qualified, qualified, or not qualified. If they didn’t know the candidate, they were instructed to answer, “No Opinion.” At first glance, Mark Sullivan has the highest rating with 25% well qualified versus Goodman’s 23.1% well qualified. If you look at the raw number of votes, Sullivan is still ahead with 151 well qualified to Goodman’s 139.

Goodman would like you to throw out the “No Opinion” votes and recalculate the percentages. That would skew the numbers in her favor, giving her 54% for well qualified to Sullivan’s 51%. However, that method is statistically insignificant. Remove the “No Opinion” vote and you are suddenly comparing apples to oranges. The results cannot be compared when there is now a different number of people voting in each candidate’s survey. If you wanted to properly discount the “No Opinion” voters you would have to compare the categories individually, as shown here. Those numbers still put Mark Sullivan on top.

Perhaps the more interesting numbers are not those of Goodman and Sullivan, but those of Patricia Cole. With 117 votes for “Not Qualified,” no matter which way you calculate it, she has the highest number in that category.

Catherine Goodman had difficulties following the law when applying for a position on the ballot, disregarded campaign finance laws, and is now manipulating results to show them in her favor. On the campaign trail she says she writes the law and that she knows the law, but can she follow the law?

State Law: Separation of Campaign and State

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According to Facebook photos, Tarrant County Commissioner Roy Brooks’ campaign appears to be using county vehicles for campaign purposes.

The photos show Brooks’ Executive Assistant, Leon Polk, driving and posing with a county vehicle with campaign signs attached. We know that one was used in the 2018 MLK Day Parade in Downtown Fort Worth. The other, based on the date and location of the photo, was presumably used in the 2016 Juneteenth celebration. All elected officials should know that anything publicly funded cannot be used for campaigning. Elected officials must separate campaign and state–public resources cannot be used for campaign purposes.

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Commissioners Declare War on Legislature

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This week Tarrant County Judge Whitley declared war on the Texas legislature. Whitley is attempting to blame the legislature for the massive increases homeowners are experiencing in their local property taxes. In so doing, he declares the legislature the enemy. All 4 senators representing Tarrant County responded in one unified voice, you can read that response HERE.

Whitley is obviously in deflection mode attempting to draw attention away from his tax and spend ways and toward a way to blame others, typical politician. But he is not alone.

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All Four Tarrant County Senators Response to Glen Whitley’s Misinformation

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February 11, 2018

To the Editor of the Fort Worth Star-Telegram:

Tarrant County Judge Glen Whitley tells a bold-faced lie about the state budget and local property taxes and is hailed as a “truth teller” by the Fort Worth Star-Telegram?

Let’s set the record straight. Local property tax rates are set by locally elected officials. Period. They are not determined by an informational rider in the state budget as Judge Whitley dishonestly suggests. He well knows our school finance formula dictates that local property tax revenue go into the system first, with state funding added on top. This has been the case since the 1940s. Local property tax collections dictate the state’s share of education funding – not vice versa.

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Desperate Times, Desperate Measures.

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Transparency won a small victory in the 141st District Court. Charlie Geren’s 2016 campaign operative, David Sorenson, will not be able to continue his delay tactics. David Sorenson must now appear in court before the March Primary, according to a February 2nd Motion to Compel. He will finally be on the record and under oath about his alleged attempt to sabotage the Bo French campaign with a false child abuse accusation. Sorenson’s testimony could reveal some very dirty politics sanctioned by the Geren campaign to destroy his opponent.

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